China Visa

China

Visa

We are simply the easiest solution to Chinese Visa applications.

Visa Logistic is able to assist individuals, travel agents and corporate clients in obtaining the visas they require to travel to China.

Over the years we have established good relationships with Embassies, Consulates and submission offices insuring great service all round. We have offices in Pretoria and Johannesburg insuring that they are always available for updates on all applications.

Our Offices

Head Office
5 Helene Avenue, Blackheath, Cape Town, South Africa
(+27) 21 554 7861
support@visalogistics.co.za

 

Johannesburg Office
Ground Floor, Fredman Towers, 13 Fredman Drive, Sandton
(+27) 11 970 7070
sandton@onevisaworld.com

Contact Us

Visa Logistics

info@visalogistics.co.za
Cell: +27 82 672 6786
Tel: +27 (21) 554 7861
Fax: +27 86 519 5786

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  1. Valid passport (at least six months before expiration) with at least two blank visa pages left and under good condition.
  2. Completed Chinese visa application form A and B with clean and tidy hand-writting, one colored passport photo taken in the last six months.
  3. For additional requirements of documentaries, see section " Visa Categories and Requirements of Supporting Documents".
  4. Applicants may submit the application in person or entrust close friends or some agencies (agents) to do so.
  5. Applicants should be physically in HK before entrusting other people to submit their applications.
  6. Applicants with HK resident status should provide personal Hong Kong Identity Card and a copy of the said ID card, besides the passports and other required documents. Applicants have to write an authorized letter when they entrust people to submit the applications.
  7. Applicants without HK resident status are required to submit their applications through the Chinese Embassy or consulate office around your resident country.
  8. Children, born in mainland China with Chinese ancestry, should apply the first visa back to their home country.
  9. 9, Applicants without HK resident status can not apply for multi-entry-visa at our office, and they are required provide their Chinese visa records during the submission.

Issued to family members of foreigners residing in China for work, study, etc.

The S visa is a new visa type issued to family members of foreign professionals and students in China. Spouses, children, brothers, sisters, parents and parents-in-law of foreigners residing in China all qualify for this S visa, which is much more generous than the international standard limited to only spouses and children. The policy is sure to benefit many foreigners, making their lives much easier and more comfortable here in China. Also, the new move can help China attract and retain international expertise, boost tourism and attract more overseas talent.The S visa has two categories S1 and S2. S1 is issued to "Immediate family members" for purposes of entry and long-term family visits to foreigners residing in China for work or study, and to those who intend to go to China for other private matters. Here "immediate family members" refers to spouses, parents, parents-in-law and children under the age of 18. S2 is issued to "Family members" of work Z and student X visa holders, including spouses, parents, children, spouses of sons or daughters, brothers, sisters, grandparents, grandchildren and parents-in-law, and to those who intend to go to China for other private matters. The other difference between S1 and S2 is that S1 allows a stay of more than six months, while S2 is issued for shorter visits. S1 holders must apply for a Temporary Residence Permit within 30 days of entry. The residence permit can be granted with a minimum of 90 days and a maximum of five years. S2 holders must stay in China during the period on the visa.

Issued to relatives of Chinese citizens or foreigners with permanent residence permit residing in PRC.

Overseas Chinese can expect to benefit from the change when they return to China for family reunions. Depending upon the duration of stay and applicants' classification, the Q visa is further divided into two subclasses: Q1 and Q2.

Q1 is issued to relatives of Chinese citizens applying to enter and reside in China for purposes of family reunion, and to those who apply for family reunion of foreigners with Permanent Residency in China, as well as to persons applying to enter and reside in China for foster care, adoption and other reasons; Q2 is issued to relatives of Chinese citizens or foreigners with permanent residence in China for a short period of stay (less than 6 months).

Q1 is generally issued with a single entry and 30 days, and the holders must apply for Temporary Residence Permit within 30 days after entry. The residence permit can be granted for a minimum of 90 days and a maximum of 5 years. So, holders can exit and reenter freely during the validity of the residence permit. Q2 is flexible from 30 to 180 days, allows single, double, or multiple entries, and the holders can stay in China within the duration period as indicated on visa.

The tourist (L) and transit (G) visas are the only ones that you can apply for without assistance from a business, government or academic institution.

Issued to aliens who are going to PRC for tourism.
Most visitors to China will only require a tourist L which will allow them to travel freely in most parts of China as tourists. If your situation is not described by one of the other visa types, then this should be the one you need.

If you are travelling in an organised tour group you might not have an individual visa in your passport.  Instead, the tour group will be issued with a group L. The invitation letter issued by the travel agency is required. In such situations you will supply your details to the travel agency before you travel and then you have no further concerns. If you are travelling to Hainan province in an organised group you might also find that no visa is required.

Issued to aliens who are going to a third country in transit of PRC.

Transit visas are for persons who are staying for a short period while in transit between two other countries.  You must have residency in the destination country or have a valid visa for it (if required).  The fee appears to be the same as for a tourist L, so check whether you might as well get a tourist L instead.

Some airports do not have an international transfer area and you might have to collect your baggage and exit into the main area so you would expect to need a visa.  However, in some instances the airport immigration officials will issue you with a 24 hour 'Stay Permit'.  When you make bookings that look like you will not be checked straight through to your final destination, you are advised to ask the airline or the agent, or contact the embassy or consulate to check if a transit visa is required.

Issued to crewmembers involving international-based transportation by trains, airway and ships and their accompanying family members.

Persons arriving as crew on international planes, ships or trains and their family members should apply for it.  Clearly they should obtain information and complete formalities via their employers.

Additional Requirements: A letter of guarantee issued by the foreign transport company, or the invitation letter issued by the relevant units from China is required.
Note:
a. Crew members from following 11 airline companies may apply for multiple entry C valid for two years: United Airlines, Continental Airlines, Delta Airlines, American Airlines, UPS, Federal Express, Polar Air Cargo, Evergreen Air Cargo, Kalitta Air Inc., Southern Air Inc. and World Airways Inc.
b. Non-regular scheduled flight, chartered flight, private plane must get the Aviation Permit before departure.

Issued to foreign journalists for the purpose of reporting from PRC.

The long stay J1 is for resident journalists, the short stay, J2, is for those who are visiting for short term assignments.  These are rather specialist visas and there are several extra requirements including approvals, invitations from the Chinese media authorities, or itineraries.  There are extra requirements if you want to bring filming equipment into China.  You will find the full details on the application form.The J-1 is only for 30 days from the date of arrival during which time you and your local organisation must seek a Temporary Residence Permit for the duration of your contract, to a maximum of  5 years.

Additional Requirements: For J1 or J2, the applicant should go through formalities in accordance with relevant China's regulations or provisions, and submit the corresponding application documents. For foreign journalists coming for profession-related purposes such as news coverage, interview or reporting, the Visa Notification Letter issued by the Information Department of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of PRC, and official letter signed by the head of the foreign media organization (with details as follows: name list, arrival and departure time, places of interview, content to cover, introduction of the news agency, and name/address/contact number of the news agency) are required. For applications at Chinese embassies or consulates, please contact the Press Section in advance.
Note: J1 holders shall apply for a residence permit within 30 days after entry.

Business (F/M) Issued to aliens who are invited to PRC for business visit, an investigation, a lecture, scientific-technological & cultural exchanges, intern practice.

Issued to aliens who are going to PRC for study, furthering studies. Student Visa is divided into X1 and X2. X1 is issued to aliens who come to China for study, advanced studies, or fieldwork for more than 6 months. X2 is issued to aliens who come to China with same purpose but for a period of less than 6 months. The organization must be accredited for offering courses or internships to foreigners.  They will send you a JW201 or JW202 form and an admission letter.  Submit these with photocopies with your application.

You are not permitted to work on the X type visa. But part-time work and internships off campus may be authorized in near future. You should contact you university or employer after you have settled in to see what can be arranged.  For foreign students who work in violation of the regulations on the administration of foreign students working to support their study in China and work beyond the prescribed scope of jobs or prescribed time limit, they shall be deemed unlawful employment and will probably have to stop or be expelled.

X1 holders shall apply for a Temporary Residence Permit from the local Public Security Bureau (PSB) within 30 days upon entry into China. The temporary residence permit can be issued with validity of 180 days to 5 years.  X2 holders shall stay in China within the duration period as indicated on the visa, and it is not necessary for them to apply for the temporary residence permit.

Issued to aliens who are going to PRC for a post or employment.

A work visa is required for persons wanting to work in China for pay.  It is also issued to aliens who come to China for commercial entertainment performance. It is only granted if you and the employer meet certain requirements.  First, the organisation must be accredited to employ foreigners. You must meet the requirements as a 'foreign expert' and the employer must obtain a certificate stating that you comply. The most common employment is teaching English for which the minimum qualifications are stated as having English as a first language and having at least a Bachelors degree and two year teaching experience. The age limit for male applicants is 18 - 60, and 18 - 55 for female applicants. However, there is some flexibility in these requirements so if you can find a willing employer they still have a chance of obtaining approvals for you.

The employer will send you a government issued Employment Permit and Visa Notification Letter which you must submit with a photocopies with your application. Accompanying family members should apply for new S1 or S2 visa submitting invitation letter from the relative with work Z in China and a 'proof of relationship'  i.e. their marriage certificate for a spouse, or birth certificate for a child.

This Z is valid for only 30 days from the date of arrival during which time you and your employer must seek a Temporary Residence Permit for the duration of your contract, to the minimum of 90 days and the maximum of 5 years.

Issued to aliens who are going to reside permanently in PRC.

In summary, the regulations state that a person who has lived 5 years in China and is a desirable person may obtain permanent residence status.  In practice it seems that very few people are able to achieve this status. China is not an immigrant country (like the USA, Canada, Australia) and does not seek foreign permanent residents. Unless you have made massive investments which have generated substantial profit to China and you have good connections with the establishment, it seems you are unlikely to succeed.

Additional Requirements: For Resident D, applicants should provide original and copy of the Confirmation form for foreigner's Permanent Residence Status issued by the Ministry of Public Security of the PRC.
Note: D holders are required to apply for the foreigners' residence permit within 30 days after entry at the exit/entry administration of public security organs under local governments at or above the county level in the proposed place of residence.

Issued to high-level personnel and much-needed highly talented people.

Under the regulations from September 1 2013, the R Visa is issued to foreign high-level personnel and much-needed highly talented people who need to stay in China. The measure would complement the existing Work Z Visa that allows foreigners to work in China if they have a work permit or employment certificate issued by the competent Chinese authorities. The Chinese government has shown its sincerity towards global talent with this policy and created a friendlier environment for them to work in China.

However, the regulations do not mention what constitutes the type of talents sought. Indubitably, eligible applicants for the R visa must have the highly-skilled and specialized qualities that are urgently needed due to a short supply among Chinese. To apply for R application itself from Chinese embassies and consulates, those professionals shall firstly obtain the qualification approval in accordance with the provision of the relevant competent departments of the provincial government for the high-level personnel and much-needed highly proficient talents, and submit the appropriate supporting documents.

The final regulations don’t explain in detail about the duration of stay issued to the R, and it is neither referred to as residence visa (which is required to apply for the Temporary Residence Permit after entry such as Q1 and S1) nor referred to as stay visa (with a stay of less than 180 days such as Q2 and S2). So, things will be clear later when the first person who gets his/her R after September 1 2013.

The required documentation to support your application differs according to the visa you are seeking.  Here we explain some of the requirements though it is not your responsibility to organize all of them, the organisation you will be dealing with will need to arrange the ones special to your visa type, except for tourist visas, of course.  Naturally, you should assist where required by providing information. Preparing the documents can take some time, from a couple of weeks to months, as many bureaucratic procedures are involved.  It is a good idea, however, to keep checking back with them that they are getting on with it as sometimes matters can slip.

Non-business Exchanges and Visits (F Visa)
F is issued to foreigners invited to China on a noncommercial exchange, investigation or visits for scientific-technological, education, cultural exchanges, health or sports activities. In some situations overseas businessmen with a need to travel frequently in and out of China over a longer period may be granted a 12 month multiple entry F.

The F type has over the years been used as a 'catch all' option.  Consular offices seem to have been willing to issue them relatively easily and often for longer durations than a tourist L. It is not permitted to work as an employee of a Chinese business in China while on an F (there are a few exceptions such as working for a company funded from overseas), but many people have done so, often with the full knowledge of local officials, but on the other hand some people have been expelled!

Beijing

Beijing, China’s massive capital, has history stretching back 3 millennia. Yet it’s known as much for its modern architecture as its ancient sites such as the grand Forbidden City complex, the imperial palace during the Ming and Qing dynasties. Nearby, the massive Tiananmen Square pedestrian plaza is site of Mao Zedong’s mausoleum and the National Museum of China, displaying a vast collection of cultural relics

Shanghai

Enormous Shanghai, on China’s central coast, is the country's biggest city and a global financial hub. Its heart is the Bund, a famed waterfront promenade lined with colonial-era buildings. Across the Huangpu River rises Pudong’s futuristic skyline, including 632m Shanghai Tower and the Oriental Pearl TV Tower, with distinctive pink spheres. Sprawling Yuyuan Garden has traditional pavilions, towers and ponds.

Guangzhou

Guangzhou is a sprawling port city northwest of Hong Kong on the Pearl River. Considered the birthplace of dim sum, it has a thriving food scene. Its markets specialize in wares ranging from eyeglasses to electronics. The sandbar Shamian Island, across a canal from Guangzhou, has leafy streets and grand mansions that are a legacy from its time as a foreign concession

Chongqing

Chongqing is a sprawling municipality at the confluence of the Yangtze and Jialing rivers in southwestern China. In the city center, the large, domed Great Hall of the People complex stands above pedestrianized People's Square. On the other side of the square, the Three Gorges Museum features artifacts from the construction of the Three Gorges Dam as well as ancient art.

Hong Kong

Hong Kong is a city, and former British colony, in southeastern China. Vibrant and densely populated, it’s a major port and global financial center famed for its tower-studded skyline. It’s also known for its lively food scene – from Cantonese dim sum to extravagant high tea – and its shopping, with options spanning chaotic Temple Street Night Market to the city’s innumerable bespoke tailors.

Tianjin

Tianjin is a major port city in northeastern China. Following the 1858 Treaties of Tianjin, several Western nations established concessions in Tianjin. The European-style houses, municipal buildings and churches in Wudadao (Five Great Avenues) and the surrounding historic districts are legacies of that period. Standing in contrast are the city’s many modern skyscrapers, including the iconic 415m-tall Tianjin Radio and Television Tower.

Shenzhen

Shenzhen, in southeastern China, is a modern metropolis that links Hong Kong to China’s mainland. It's known for its shopping destinations, including Luohu Commercial City, a massive mall with a vast array of wares, from tailors’ custom clothing to faux designer bags. The city also features contemporary buildings, such as the 384m skyscraper Sung Hing Square, and a number of amusement parks.

Hangzhou

Hangzhou, the capital of China’s Zhejiang province, is known as the southern terminus of the ancient Grand Canal waterway, originating in Beijing. Its West Lake, celebrated by poets and artists since the 9th century, encompasses islands (reachable by boat), temples, pavilions, gardens and arched bridges. On its south bank is 5-story Leifeng Pagoda, a modern reconstruction of a structure built in 975 C.E.

Nanjing

Nanjing, capital of China’s eastern Jiangsu province, is roughly 300 km up the Yangtze River from Shanghai. It was the national capital during part of the Ming dynasty and, in the 20th century, the Republic of China. Many monuments and landmarks remain, including Zhonghuamen (Gate of China), a preserved 14th-century section of the massive wall that contained the old city’s southern entrance.

Chengdu

Chengdu is the capital of southwestern China's Sichuan province. The city is famed for its cuisine, defined by the spicy Sichuan peppercorn, which flavors hot-pot dishes and other regional specialties. The city is also home to the famous Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding, a conservation center where visitors can view endangered giant pandas in a natural habitat.

About China

Beijing, Shanghai and Xian are very famous Chinese cities in the world. Beijing, capital of the country, is the center of the country's political, economic, cultural and educational center; Shanghai is a well-developed metropolis with prosperous economy; Xian, the ancient capital of 13 dynasties, possesses abundant historical heritage.

Besides, you may go to visit Shenzhen, Guangzhou, Hangzhou, Suzhou, Guilin, Lijiang, Jiuzhaigou, Sanya, Tibet or Xinjiang. Shenzhen and Guangzhou are well-known coastal cities with fast economic development; Hangzhou and Suzhou boast beautiful water towns, lakes and gardens as well as favorable climate; Guilin, Lijiang and Jiuzhaigou are famed for unique natural scenery, and characteristic ethnic minorities' culture; Sanya in Hainan Province makes you enjoy the charming tropical scenery; Tibet has mysterious religious beliefs, vast grasslands and highest mountains; and Xinjiang attracts visitors by its various ethnic minorities and numerous historical relics along the Silk Road.

FAQ

Do I need a visa to visit China's mainland?

Foreign citizens generally need a visa to visit China's mainland with the exception of visa-free entry according to relevant agreements and regulations. (See Exemption of visa for more information.)

I am a U.S. citizen, can I apply for a Chinese visa at the port of entry?

U.S. citizens must obtain a visa before arrival in China. You are not eligible for a landing visa.

I have received my visa, but there will be a change in my trip plan. Do I need to apply for a change of the visa type or validity?

Once your visa application is processed and approved, you will not be able to change a visa type or validity unless you request the visa be voided by the Visa Office and apply and pay for a new one. If you have entered China, you should apply to the local Public Security authority for a change in visa type or an extension of stay or validity. Your application will be considered by the Public Security authority in accordance with relevant Chinese Laws and Regulations.

I get a new passport, but I have a valid Chinese visa in my old passport. Can I travel with both passports to China without applying for a new visa?

Yes, you may travel with both passports provided that your visa is still valid and the personal details including your name, sex, date of birth and nationality on both passports are exactly the same.

I have received my visa. Is there a guarantee that I will be allowed to enter China?

A visa is not a guarantee to enter China. The decision on whether or not you will be allowed to enter China is made at a port of entry by Chinese Border Control authority in accordance with Chinese Laws and Regulations. Why I was granted a different type of visa with what I applied for?

The consular officers will determine whether or not to grant a visa and its category, validity and permitted duration of stay. The decision is final unless there is an technical error on the visa.

Do you provide express visa service?

Yes. Express service is available for an additional fee. You need to make such request to our staff while submitting your application. Please note that not all applications can be expedited as some requires longer processing time.

I need to apply for a Chinese visa, what documents should I submit with my application?

You need to prepare your valid passport, duly completed and signed visa application form, a passport photo, and supporting documents based on the purpose of your trip.

What are the requirements for passport, visa application form and photo?

Your passport must valid at least for one year, and not altered/damaged/smudged in any way. Make sure you TYPE to complete and sign an up-to-date version of visa application form (V2013). You must provide true, complete and accurate answers to each question on the form. The form needs to be signed by the applicant (or a parent /guardian in case of a minor). Only original signature is accepted.

You must provide one color, passport-type photo that meets the following criteria: be taken within the last six months against a white background and printed on high-quality photo paper; 2'x2' in size; showing the full frontal view of you head without any headwear.

What are the requirements for an invitation letter?

The invitation letter may be in the form of fax, photocopy or computer printout, and must be signed by the inviter and/or company seal in case of a business invite. An applicant may be required to provide the original invitation letter as deemed necessary by a consular officer.

Do I have to provide Physical Examination Form to apply for a visa?

No.

I will be traveling to China on company business. I will also meet my friends in China. What type of visa is most appropriate for me?

If you travel to China on multiple purposes, you may submit your application based on your main purpose and provide supporting documents accordingly.

What should I do if I lose my passport during my stay in China?

You should report the loss to local public security authorities as soon as possible and go to your country's embassy or consulate in China to apply for a replacement passport or travel document. After that, you must go to the local public security authorities to apply for a new entry and exit visa.

I am currently in China on a visa and the permitted time of stay is almost up, but I need to stay longer. May I send my passport back to a friend in U.S. in order to get a new valid visa?

No. You must leave mainland China if you need to apply for a new visa. Or you may apply for an extension of visa from the local public security authorities in China.

I am planning to travel as a tourist to Hong Kong, Macao and other cities in China. Do I need different visas?

If you are a U.S. citizen, you need to apply for mainland China visa only. For non-U.S. citizens, if you are not eligible for a short-term visa-free visit to HKSAR/Macao SAR, you will need to apply both mainland China visa AND HKSAR/Macao SAR visa.

I am now in China on a Z visa and have received my residence permit. Can I leave China and come back as often as I wish?

You may use your residence permit (placed on your passport and similar to a visa) issued by the local public security authority to enter and exit China during the validity of the residence permit. No other visa is needed.

If you are a Chinese Permanent Resident Card holder, you don't need a visa to enter China during the validity of your Permanent Resident Card.

Apply Now With Confidence!

Simply call: +27 (0)82 672 6786 /+27 (21) 554 7861 or email: info@visalogisitcs.co.za